Introducing Aloe…

I am going to start off by apologising for my random photographs… I must sadly admit that I haven’t been behind my camera for quite a while now 😦 , so I’m left delving into my archives… Please excuse!!! I will try to change this ASAP!!!

Today I’m showing you a photograph of an Aloe Plant (unfortunately with 500+ species, I have no idea which one it is!!!!)… This plant is very common in South Africa & famous for its medical uses… – – – especially with burns & skin conditions – – -!!! This plant is in our “back garden”… (a lot of processing done – maybe I’ll take a few ‘au naturelle’ photos to give you a better idea of what it looks like!!!) 😀 **

Have a great evening everyone!!! Friday tomorrow!!! – My Favourite – Queue Happy-dance!!!! 😀 **

24 thoughts on “Introducing Aloe…

  1. weedimageoftheday

    Hi Xandre, we love Alove Vera here in Southern California, and I’ve got some in my back yard as well. The processing seems to capture the very heat and burning that Aloe Vera treats, so nice choice!

    Reply
  2. Leanne Cole

    I have one of these growing in my back yard too, but it doesn’t look anything like this, it is very small, still growing. I didn’t know they flowered.
    I like the shot and I like the angle you have taken it from. I don’t think you have done too much processing, you have play.

    Reply
  3. SL Schildan

    A great Op-Art photo! Your processing makes it very dynamic.

    We have aloe here in the northwest USA as well, but usually just buy it in bottles and it is used for burns, insect bites, abrasions, rashes and hair gel. Haha 😀

    PS No apologies necessary 😉 some things get better with age. Plus, some photos are a one of a kind opportunity.

    Reply
  4. photosfromtheloonybin

    Ok, the bottom parts of the plant look like the aloe we get here, but I have never seen anything like the top part of that plant. Forgive my ignorance about plants :), but is that considered the flowering part of the plant?? Beautiful photo by the way, and there is nothing wrong with dipping into the archives. I do that all the time!!

    Reply
    1. Xandré Verkes Post author

      I must admit Cindy, that me too, have very little (to no) knowledge about plants!!!! 😦 But yes, I would think that that part would be considered the flowering part!!! 🙂 **

      Reply
  5. Bel

    I have an aloe as a pot plant. My mum gave it to me, and I’ve often used it for cuts ad burns. No scars remained, it’s a miracle plant.

    Reply
    1. Xandré Verkes Post author

      Wow…. I’ve never actually used it for burns…. but I’ll keep the ‘no scars’ in mind when I need to use it!!! Truly a miracle plant!!!! 🙂 **

      Reply
      1. Bel

        Mind you, if the wounds are big and/or bad, it’s best to go and see a doctor, but for all else aloe juice really helps. 🙂

        Reply
  6. island traveler

    Dark and shadows on the right, light and brightness at the left…superbly amazing. Like a beautiful memory that warms the heart and soul. Thank you. have a wonderful weekend…

    Reply
  7. sofitoffee

    Gorgeous photo!!!! Wow I absolutely love the lighting and burned effect. Very very well done Xandre 🙂

    Reply

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